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Health Tips for Heart, Mind, and Body
Unhealthy lifestyle. It’s a common contributor of our biggest health problems: stroke, heart disease, diabetes, cancer. 
1. Daily exercise.
You brush your teeth every day; exercise is equally important for your daily routine. Turn off the TV or computer, and get at least 30 minutes of exercise every day. To work your heart, it’s got to be aerobic exercise. You’ve got lots of options: walking, jogging, biking, rowing machine, elliptical machine, swimming. But don’t feel like you have to be an athlete. Walking is great exercise. Get 10 minutes here and there during the day. It all counts.

2. Healthy diet.
Quit eating junk food and high-fat fast food. Your heart, brain, and overall health are harmed by foods high in saturated fats, salt, and cholesterol. There’s no getting around it. You’ve got to replace them with healthy foods: lots of fruits, vegetables, fish, nuts, olive oil — what we call the Mediterranean diet.
3. Weight loss.
Too much body weight puts your health at great risk. When you take in more calories than you burn, you get fat — it’s that simple. You’ve got to eat less. You’ve got to exercise more. You’ve got to push yourself to make these lifestyle changes — but you’ve got to do it to help avoid serious health problems like heart disease, diabetes, or stroke.
4. Regular physical exams.
Tell your doctor your family medical history. Learn your personal risk factors, and the screening tests you need. Women may have mammograms to screen for breast cancer and Pap tests for cervical cancer. Men may have prostate cancer PSA tests. Routine screening for colorectal cancer should start at age 50, perhaps earlier if colon cancer runs in your family. You also need regular diabetes, blood pressure, and cholesterol tests. Make sure your immunizations are up to date. You may need flu and pneumonia shots, depending on your age.

We should not be working so hard that we’re neglecting the things that keep us healthy. This is important advice, too, for people who take care of elderly parents or young children. Make sure you’re getting proper exercise and sleep — and that you’re not trying to do too much.

5. Measure servings and control portions

Eating too much of any food, even low-calorie vegetables, can result in weight gain.
Therefore, people should avoid estimating a serving size or eating food directly from the packet. It is better to use measuring cups and serving size guides. Guessing leads to overestimating and the likelihood of eating a larger-than-necessary portion.
The following size comparisons can be useful for monitoring food intake when dining out:
  • three-fourths of a cup is a golf ball
  • one-half of a cup is a tennis ball
  • 1 cup is a baseball
  • 1 ounce (oz) of nuts is a loose handful
  • 1 teaspoon is 1 playing die
  • 1 tablespoon is a thumb tip
  • 3 oz of meat is a deck of cards
  • 1 slice is a DVD
These sizes are not exact, but they can help a person moderate their food intake when the correct tools are not available.

6. Eat mindfully

Many people benefit from mindful eating, which involves being fully aware of why, how, when, where, and what they eat.
Making more healthful food choices is a direct outcome of becoming more in tune with the body.
People who practice mindful eating also try to eat more slowly and savor their food, concentrating on the taste. Making a meal last for 20 minutes allows the body to register all of the signals for satiety.
It is important to focus on being satisfied after a meal rather than full and to bear in mind that many "all natural" or low-fat foods are not necessarily a healthful choice.
People can also consider the following questions regarding their meal choice:
  • Is it good "value" for the calorie cost?
  • Will it provide satiety?
  • Are the ingredients healthful?
  • If it has a label, how much fat and sodium does it contain?

7. Stimulus and cue control

Many social and environmental cues might encourage unnecessary eating. For example, some people are more likely to overeat while watching television. Others have trouble passing a bowl of candy to someone else without taking a piece.
By being aware of what may trigger the desire to snack on empty calories, people can think of ways to adjust their routine to limit these triggers.

8. Plan ahead

Stocking a kitchen with diet-friendly foods and creating structured meal plans will result in more significant weight loss.
People looking to lose weight or keep it off should clear their kitchen of processed or junk foods and ensure that they have the ingredients on hand to make simple, healthful meals. Doing this can prevent quick, unplanned, and careless eating.
Planning food choices before getting to social events or restaurants might also make the process easier.

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